25 Colorful Backyard birds of Mississippi for you to explore

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Backyard birds of Mississippi

If you’re a bird lover, then Mississippi is the place for you! Mississippi is home to a variety of different habitats, each of which support a unique array of plants and animals. The state’s diverse landscapes provide opportunities for outdoor recreation and offer a glimpse into the state’s natural history.

Mississippi’s habitats range from the Gulf Coast beaches to the upland forests of the interior. The state’s coastal habitats are among the most productive in the world, supporting a wide variety of plant and animal life.

Mississippi’s climate is characterized by hot, humid summers and mild winters making it the perfect place to bird watch.

The Magnolia State boasts an impressive diversity of backyard birds, making it a great destination for birdwatching. Whether you’re new to birdwatching or are a seasoned pro, Mississippi has something to offer everyone.

In this blog post, we will take a look at some of Mississippi’s top backyard birds and discuss what to expect from each species. If you’re looking for a great place to watch birds, Mississippi is definitely worth considering!

So if you’re interested in learning more about Mississippi’s backyard birds, keep reading!

Backyard Birds Of Mississippi

According to the latest data from ebird, there are 404 observed species of Birds in Mississippi. This data comes from over 158,000 checklists from over 7,451 avid birdwatchers. Identifying and seeing all 404 may be an overwhelming challenge, so we have chosen to focus on the birds you are more likely to see in your home, backyard, or bird feeders.

Here are some things to know about Backyard Birds of Mississippi:

  • 404 observed species
  • The Northern Cardinal is the most common backyard bird in Mississippi
  • The Northern Cardinal is the most common feeder bird in Mississippi.
  • The Carolina Chickadee is the smallest most common feeder bird in Mississippi
  • The Common Grackle is the largest backyard bird on this list
  • The Northern Mockingbird is Mississippi’s state bird

What Are The Most Common Backyard Birds Of Mississippi?

  1. Northern Cardinal
  2. House Finch
  3. Tufted Titmouse
  4. Carolina Chickadee
  5. Carolina Wren
  6. Red-bellied Woodpecker
  7. American Goldfinch
  8. Mourning Dove
  9. Chipping Sparrow
  10. Blue Jay
  11. Pine Siskin
  12. Brown-headed Cowbird
  13. Dark-eyed Junco
  14. White-throated Sparrow
  15. Purple Finch
  16. American Robin
  17. Yellow-rumped Warbler
  18. Red-winged Blackbird
  19. Eastern Bluebird
  20. Northern Mockingbird
  21. House Sparrow
  22. Common Grackle
  23. Brown Thrasher
  24. Downy Woodpecker
  25. Cedar Waxwing

Top 5 Hotspots For Birdwatching In Mississippi

If you prefer to venture away from home to do some birding, then visit one of Mississippi’s best hotspots for birdwatching. These hotspots are determined by the total number of species observed by fellow birdwatchers in Mississippi.

  1. Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge
  2. Ansley Preserve
  3. St Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge
  4. Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge
  5. Bellefontanie Beach

Top 25 Backyard Birds Of Mississippi

The list below is determined by the number of bird watchers in Mississippi who have seen a species at least once, divided by the total number of bird feeder sites.

1. Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal is a common species of bird found in the United States and id the most common backyard bird of Mississippi. These majestic red birds can be seen in Mississippi year round.  

Northern Cardinals are small songbirds, with males and females generally weighing less between 42 – 48g (1.5 – 1.7 oz), and are 21-23cm (8.3-9.1 inches) long.

Northern cardinals have a distinctive crest on their head that can be raised when they feel threatened or aggressive; however, this behavior is not often observed in wild populations and has been lost to captive ones.

The Northern Cardinal’s feathers range from bright red in males to brownish orange in females, and their bills are short but wide at the base – giving them an upturned appearance, making them easy to identify.

Northern Cardinals have a varied diet that consists of fruits, seeds, berries, and insects and are very common at most bird feeders but prefer to eat seeds such as sunflower, safflower, and cracked corn from the ground.

The Northern Cardinal has been seen at 100% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Tube feeder
  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet
  • Milo

2. House Finch

The House Finch is a small bird found in most of North America, including parts of the United States and Southern Canada. They can be seen in Mississippi all year round.

House Finches are 12-15cm (5.1-5.5 inches) long and weigh between 16-27g (0.6-0.9oz).

They have short wings that allow for a quick flight, and their beaks are stubby and slightly curved on top with a long flat head. The males are known for their bright red heads and breast with brown wings, tails, and back.

Their preferred habitat is open, grassy areas with some trees – often near farmlands. They will also be found around towns and suburbs to find food quickly on the ground, such as birdseed spilled from backyard bird feeders (or even at pet food bowls left out for our furry friends).

They are ground forages whose preferred diet consists mainly of seeds, buds, and fruit. They are common at backyard bird feeders and will often feed in large numbers, especially when black oil sunflowers seeds are present in your feeders.

The House Finch has been seen at 100% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large & Small Tube Feeder
  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Nyjer

3. Tufted Titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse is a small species of bird that can be found throughout much of the Eastern half of North America. They can be seen year round in Mississippi.

They are gray above and white below with a crested head and small black forehead. Tufted Titmice are only about 14 – 16cm (5.5-6.3 inches) long and weigh around 18-26g (0.6-0.9oz).

Tufted Titmice are sociable birds found in pairs or groups living in deciduous woods, towns, wooded suburbs, and parks. They are omnivorous with a diet that consists mainly of insects and some seeds and berries.

Although they prefer to glean foliage for their preferred food, Tufted Titmice will readily visit bird feeders searching for sunflower seeds, peanuts or suet.

The Tufted Titmouse has been seen at 100% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

4. Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee is a small species found primarily in the southeastern United States. These small birds can be seen in Mississippi year round.

Carolina Chickadees are only about 11cm (4 inches) long and weigh between 8-12g (0.3-0.4oz). They have gray-white feathers with a distinct dark cap on their head and dark throat with white cheeks and gray bill, giving them the “chickadee” appearance from which they get their name.

Their preferred habitat is deciduous or mixed woods with large trees for roosting and nesting. They also inhabit woodlands around towns, suburbs and parks. 

Carolina Chickadees are omnivorous birds that eat both insects and seeds – making them widespread backyard visitors. They prefer feeding on seeds and sunflower seed mixes from bird feeders but will also eat suet in wintertime.

The Carolina Chickadee has been seen at 100% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large & Small Tube Feeder
  • Suet Cage
  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil & Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Nyjer
  • Suet
  • Peanuts & Peanut Hearts
  • Mealworms

5. Carolina Wren

The Carolina Wren is a common bird species in the eastern part of North America and can be seen year round in Mississippi.

Carolina Wrens are small backyard birds typically between 12 – 14cm (4.7-5.5 inches) long and weigh between 18-22g (0.6-0.8oz), with males slightly larger than females. They have rusty-brown feathers with white spots on their tails and wings, with lighter brown-orange chest and belly, and a bold white line above the eye, making them very easy to identify from other birds.

Carolina Wrens spend most of their time in thick vegetation such as brushy woods, underbrush or shrubs, looking for insects and spiders to eat – making it easy to see when they fly out from their hiding place.

They are the only wren that will visit backyard bird feeders regularly and typically prefer suet feeders.

The Carolina Wren has been seen at 94% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Tube feeder
  • Suet Cage
  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Suet
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Mealworms

6. Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-Bellied Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a long, chisel-like bill. They are found in the eastern half of the United States and are a year-round resident of Mississippi.

These beautiful birds are also one of the most commonly observed woodpeckers in Mississippi.

Males and Females are about 24cm (9.4 inches) long and weigh around 56-91g (2-3.2oz). Red-bellied Woodpeckers have black-and-white stripes above and a paler below. The male has red from its bill to its nape, while the female only has a red nape. Red bellies can be seen during flight but are more challenging to see when perched.

They live in various habitats, including woodlands, bottomland forests, swamps, riversides, and parks. They are most commonly found near water to find insects to eat. 

They will seldom peck at the wood of trees to find food but instead will forage for insects whenever the opportunity presents itself. They also feed on nuts, fruits, and seeds and store their food in bark crevices.

Red-bellied woodpeckers also visit backyard bird feeders that offer suet, sunflowers seeds, or peanut butter mixed with birdseed. While at backyard feeders, they are bullish birds and will often dominate other smaller birds and their cousins (Downy & Hairy Woodpeckers).

The Red-bellied Woodpecker has been seen at 94% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Types:

  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Nectar Feeder
  • Suet Cage

Feeder food:

  • Black Oil & Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Suet
  • Cracker corn
  • Peanuts & Peanut Hearts
  • Sugar Water
  • Fruit
  • Mealworms

7. American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch is a common species of bird found throughout North America. These small birds can be seen in north Mississippi all year round and in south Mississippi during the winter months.

They are small songbirds 11-13cm (4.3-5.1 inches) long and weigh between 11-20g (0.4-0.70 oz), with males being slightly larger than females. 

Breeding adult males have a bright yellow color on their heads and rump with a black cap and black-tipped wings, making them easy to identify from other birds. Winter adult males are tan above and pale gray below with a yellow face and throat. 

Breeding adult females are olive-brown above and yellow below, and winter adult females are generally gray overall.

Their preferred habitat is overgrown, weedy fields, pastures, and well planted suburban areas and backyards.

They mainly eat seeds from wild sunflowers, composite flowers or thistles, and very few insects. 

American Goldfinches are frequent visitors of backyard bird feeders – making them easy to spot around the yard. They prefer hulled sunflower and nyjer seeds.

The American Goldfinch has been seen at 88% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large & Small Tube feeder
  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Nyjer

8. Mourning Dove

The Mourning Dove is a common species of bird found throughout North America and is a year round resident of Mississippi.

They are about the size of an American Robin, with adults between 23-34cm (9.1-13.4 inches) long and weighing between 86-170g (3-6oz). Mourning Doves have grayish-brown feathers, and their heads are pale gray; however, they lack crests or head adornments.

Mourning Doves prefer open habitats in rural and urban areas and weedy fields.

Mourning Doves are ground foragers meaning that they eat seeds, grains, and other vegetation found on the ground. They have a varied diet but prefer to eat weed seeds such as dandelions or grasses in open fields rather than forest floors. Mourning doves also drink water from puddles created by rain which they find near trees and shrubs.

They are frequent visitors to backyard bird feeders and typically eat seeds that have fallen on the ground or platform feeders.

The Mourning Dove has been seen at 88% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Hopper
  • Platform feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Nyjer
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet & Milo
  • Oats

9. Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrows are ubiquitous sparrows that are found throughout North America and can be seen in Mississippi during the spring and summer months. 

They are about 12-15cm (4.7-5.9 inches) long, weigh between 11-16g (0.4-0.6oz). Chipping Sparrows are slender, long-tailed birds with gray faces, chestnut heads, and a white belly. They have a black line through the eye, back and wings.

They have relatively short wings that allow for quick travel through thick vegetation or high into the trees where they will find their nests on a thin branch close to the trunk of a tree. Their beaks are short but thick at the end for catching insects and eating seeds from grasses or trees.

Their preferred habitat is open woodland, forest edges, and clearings. It will also be found in parks and residential areas.

Chipping Sparrows eat insects they can glean from the ground, vegetation, or the air in summer months and forage for seeds in wild grasses and weeds in the fall and winter months.

They are frequent visitors at bird feeders and prefer to eat seeds such as black oil sunflower seeds, millet, or cracked corn from a platform feeder or the ground. You will often see them in small flocks around your feeders.

The Chipping Sparrow has been seen at 82% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Nyjer
  • Cracked Corn
  • Millet

10. Blue Jay

The Blue Jay is a common species of bird found throughout North America and is a year-round resident of Mississippi.

Blue Jays are about 25-30cm (9.8-11.8 inches) long and generally weigh between 70 – 100g (2.5-3.5oz). They have a very short neck and bill with a thick blue crest on their head. They have very distinctive bright blue feathers on the top with white spots and gray-white color below, making them easy to identify from other birds.

Blue Jays are loud, boisterous birds that will eat almost anything they can find – making them one of the most common backyard visitors.

They are widespread at backyard bird feeders and will typically dominate smaller birds that visit simultaneously. They love sunflower seeds, cracked corn, and whole peanuts.

The Blue Jay has been seen at 82% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Tube feeder
  • Suet Cage
  • Large Hopper
  • Platform feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled & Black oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Suet
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanuts & Peanut Hearts
  • Fruit
  • Mealworms

11. Pine Siskin

The Pine Siskin is widespread throughout North America and some parts of Canada and Mexico. They can be seen in Mississippi primarily during the winter months.

Both males and females are about 11-14cm (4.3-5.5 inches) long and weigh between 12-18g (0.4-0.6oz). Both males and females are brown, with dark streaking throughout their bodies. They are a small finch with a sharply pointed bill and a short notched tail.

They are slightly darker above and paler below with two whitish-yellow wing bars. A yellow wing stripe can be seen during flight but is more difficult to see when perched.

They prefer open coniferous forests where they can forage in trees, looking for seeds among needles of the branches. Pine siskins are social birds and often travel in a few hundred bird flocks. They are very active and can be seen hopping around on the ground or flying quickly from tree to tree.

Pine siskins eat seeds almost exclusively but will take insects or larvae when available if seeds are not readily accessible. They are also frequent visitors to backyard bird feeders that offer sunflower seeds, or nyjer seeds.

The Pine Siskin has been seen at 76% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large and Small Tube Feeder
  • Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Nyjer

12. Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed cowbird is a small blackbird found across North America and can be seen year round in Mississippi.

The males range between 19-22cm (7.5-8.7 inches) long and weigh between 42-50g (1.5-1.8oz). The females range between 16-20cm (6.3-7.9 inches) long and weigh 42-50g (1.3-1.6oz). They have a short tail and thick sharp-tipped beak.

The males have a glossy black body with a dark brown head, and the females are grayish-brown above and a paler color below.

They prefer open areas with scattered trees like grasslands, pastures, meadows, marshes, or even agricultural fields.

The Brown-headed cowbird is a brood parasite, which means that it doesn’t build a nest of its own, but instead lays its eggs in the nests of other bird species. The host birds will then incubate and raise the cowbird chick as their own.

Cowbirds can be seen hopping around on the ground or flying low to the ground looking for food. They eat mainly seeds and grain but will also eat insects and spiders if given a chance.

Since they don’t build their own nests,  they will often be found close to humans in places like parks, golf courses, and even the backyard, which means they will often visit backyard bird feeders, especially if you use a  platform feeder or scatter seed on the ground. 

Brown-Headed cowbirds can often be a nuisance, and some people even take their feeders down in the spring or summer if they see too many cowbirds visiting.

The Brown-headed Cowbird has been seen at 71% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground Feeding

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Milo

13. Dark-eyed junco

The Dark-Eyed Junco is a medium-sized sparrow found in the Northern Hemisphere from Alaska to Newfoundland. These small birds are primarily seen in Mississippi during winter months.

Males and Females are about 14-16cm (5.5-6.3 inches) long and weigh between 18-30g (0.6-1.1oz). They have a round head, short conical bill, and long tail.

The Dark-Eyed Junco varies in color depending on what region you are in but are mainly dark gray or brown with a light/pale pink bill and white outer tail feathers that are noticeable in flight.

The three most common sub-types and colors are:

  • Slate-colored Junco – Alaska, and East of the Rocky Mountains
  • Oregon Junco – Northern Rockies and Farther West
  • Gray-headed Junco – Southern Rockies

They live in coniferous forests, woodlands, scrubland, and tundra across the United States and Canada. You are more likely to find them in open areas like backyards, fields, and parks in winter.

They are ground foragers and eat insects, seeds, and berries. They eat mostly insects in the spring and summer and seeds and berries in the fall and winter.

They are also expected at backyard bird feeders in the winter, especially ones that offer sunflower seeds, millet, or cracked corn.

The Dark-eyed Junco has been seen at 71% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower seed
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Nyjer
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet & Milo
  • Oats

14. White-throated Sparrow

The White-Throated Sparrow is a medium-large sparrow that lives primarily in the eastern half of the United States. These small birds are primarily seen in Mississippi during the winter months.

Males and Females are about 16-18cm (6.3-7.1 inches) long and weigh between 22-32g (0.8-1.1oz). They have a round head, long legs, and long tail.

Both sexes are brown above and gray below with a black and white striped head and a yellow spot above the eye and bill. Another morph is tan striped instead of black and white striped. Both morphs have a strongly outlined white throat.

They live in brushy woodlands, forest edges, wooded urban areas, parks, and gardens across the Eastern United States. Most often seen in backyards during the winter months.

They are ground foragers that often flock together to eat insects in summer and seeds and berries the rest of the year. They are common backyard birds that will visit feeders in the winter, especially ones that offer seeds scattered on the ground or a platform feeder.

The White-throated Sparrow has been seen at 71% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Types:

  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Cracker Corn
  • Millet
  • Milo

15. Purple Finch

The Purple Finch is a small finch found mainly in the eastern half of the North American continent. They can also be seen on the west coast of the United States and southern Canada. These birds can be seen in Mississippi during the winter months.

Males and Females are about 12-16cm (4.7-6.3 inches) long and weigh between 18-32g (0.6-1.1oz). They are about the same size as a house finch but with a chunkier appearance. They have short notched tails and a robust conical bill, perfect for cracking seeds.

Contrary to the name, Purple Finches are not really purple. The males have a raspberry-colored head, breast, and rump, with their wings and back having a pinky tinge. The females have no red and a patterned head and are more brown and white above and streaked below.

They live in coniferous forests, woodlands, gardens, and parks. They primarily forage on the ground or in trees for seeds, buds, fruit, and some insects and spiders

They are also common at backyard bird feeders that offer sunflower seeds, thistle, or nyjer seed during the winter.

The Purple Finch has been seen at 71% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large and Small Tube Feeder
  • Large and Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Nyjer
  • Millet

16. American Robin

The American Robin is a common species of bird found throughout North America and is a year-round resident of Mississippi.

American Robins are 20-28cm (7.9-11 inches) long and weigh 77-85g (2.7-3oz).

American Robins have a distinctive orange chest with black spots; however, their back feathers are brownish gray. Their beaks are tiny but comprehensive at the base, giving them a very distinct appearance.

They are common in most environments across North America, especially in gardens, parks, and wooded areas around towns and suburbs.

The American Robin is known to poke around in leaf litter, looking for insects such as beetles, grasshoppers, and earthworms to eat in the summer months. They prefer berries or fruit during the autumn and winter months.

They are also known for being very friendly birds found at most bird feeders and prefer feeders that offer live mealworms.

The American Robin has been seen at 71% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Platform feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Suet
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Fruit
  • Mealworms

17. Yellow-rumped warbler

Yellow-rumped Warblers are small songbirds found throughout North and Central America from Canada down to Panama. They can be seen in Mississippi during the winter months.

They are about 12-14cm (4.7-5.5 inches) long, weigh between 12-13g (0.4-0.5oz) and have long wings that allow for quick travel in thick vegetation or high into the trees where they will find their nests on a thin branch close to the trunk of a tree. Their beaks are short, solid, and pointed at the end, which they use to catch insects.

They are light gray with flashes of white in their wings. They have a yellow patch under their chin and yellow sides. Females’ colors are duller than the males, and winter plumage for both is a pale brown.

The Yellow-rumped Warbler prefers coniferous and mixed woodland habitats that provide plenty of shrubs, underbrush, and leafy trees for protection. They can also be found in parks and residential areas in the fall and winter.

They are insectivores that will prey on many insects they can catch. They will also eat small fruits or berries from early fall to spring.

The Yellow-rumped Warbler has been seen at 65% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large & Small Tube Feeders
  • Suet Cage
  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Nectar Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Suet
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Sugar Water
  • Fruit
  • Mealworms

18. Red-winged blackbird

The Red-Winged Blackbird is a stocky blackbird with a red shoulder and short tail. They are found in abundance in North America and Central America. These birds are a year-round resident of Mississippi.

Males and Females are about 17-23cm (6.7-9.1 inches) long and weigh between 32-77g (1.1-2.7oz). Males are all black with red shoulder patches tipped with a golden yellow color. Females have mostly dark brown plumage above, are heavily streaked below, and have some orange coloration on their face and throat.

They live in open habitats such as wetlands, marshes, prairies, meadows, pastures, agricultural fields, and suburban parks. They nest in marshes, wet prairies, and hayfields across the Northern half of North America from Alaska to Newfoundland.

They eat insects, seeds, and berries primarily during nesting or feeding their young and grain in the winter. Red-winged blackbirds gather in large flocks during the winter. They will often visit bird feeders that offer mixed seeds and grains and prefer to feed on the ground.

The Red-winged Blackbird has been seen at 59% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Ground feeding
  • Large Tube Feeder
  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Milo

19. Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird is a small thrush that is common throughout the Eastern half of North America and can be seen year-round in Mississippi.

They are about 16-21cm (6.3-8.3 inches) long and weigh only 28-32g (1-1.1oz). The males are known for their beautiful blue feathers above and a rusty reddish-brown throat and breast

Females are gray above with blue wings and blue tail and a more orange-brown breast. You can find them in other colors depending on the region they live in – such as black or white bodies instead of blue, grayish underparts, or orange neck patches.

Their preferred habitat is an open area such as pasture or farmland with short grasses and some trees.

Their preferred diet consists mainly of insects and other small invertebrates that they find by probing the ground. They may also eat some small fruits in winter, but insects make up many of their diets.

They are very social birds, often found in pairs or flocks – especially during migration to warmer climates for wintertime.

Eastern Bluebirds will visit bird feeders when mealworms are offered.

The Eastern Bluebird has been seen at 59% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Mealworms
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Fruit
  • Suet

20. Northern Mockingbird

The Northern Mockingbird is a common species of bird found in the United States, Mexico and some areas of Central America. These birds are year-round residents of Mississippi. 

They are very similar to American Robins except for their size – with both sexes 21-26cm (8.3-10.2 inches) long and weighing between 45-58g (1.6-2oz). They have grayish-brown feathers with black spots on their wings and tails; however, they also have white bellies, making them recognizable.

Northern Mockingbirds are not migratory but instead stay in the same location year-round. They prefer dense shrubby areas with open patches nearby, descriptive of most backyards.

Northern Mockingbirds build open-cup nests found high in trees or bushes – making them easy to see. They are primarily carnivorous, feeding mainly on insects during the summer months and switching to berries or fruit in autumn and winter.

They are a frequent visitor to backyards and will typically visit suet feeders.

The Northern Mockingbird has been seen at 59% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Suet
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Fruit
  • Mealworms

21. House Sparrow

The House Sparrow is a common species of bird found throughout the world. These small birds can be seen in Mississippi year-round.

Males and Females are about 15-17cm (5.9-6.7 inches) long and generally weigh between 27-30g (0.9-1.1oz). They have gray color on their head and chest, black spots on the feathers around their eyes, and brownish tails; however, they also have distinctive white spots on their wings.

House Sparrows are prevalent backyard visitors that can be identified by the distinctive appearance of two white spots on each side of the wing. They typically live in cities and towns with large populations, although they will visit backyards if suet feeders or birdseed is available.

House Sparrows eat mainly weed seeds, grain, and insects during breeding time. They typically prefer sunflower hearts and suet, although they also eat thistle seed, safflower seeds, and fruit when available.

Sparrows are highly social birds living in large flocks outside of breeding season that can sometimes become aggressive towards other birds.

The House Sparrow has been seen at 53% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Tube Feeder
  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts
  • Millet 
  • Milo

22. Common Crackle

The Common Grackle is a large blackbird found in abundance throughout the Eastern and Mid-Eastern parts of North America.  These birds can be seen in Mississippi year-round.

They are about the size of a Mourning Dove and are around 28-34cm (11-13.4 Inches) long and weigh between 74-142g (2.6-5oz). Males are slightly larger than females. They have a flat head with yellow eyes and a stout beak to eat insects, seeds, fruits, small invertebrates, and snails. 

They have a long tail and shiny black plumage. The male has a greenish iridescence to their feathers, while the female is less glossy with brown feathers on her head.

The Common Grackle is usually found in large flocks in open habitats that include farmlands or grassland areas. Still, it will also be seen around residential areas where food scraps are available, like compost piles or bird feeders. They can sometimes be found near wetlands too.

Common Grackles are opportunistic omnivores that eat mainly insects and some grain but supplement with food items like seeds, fruits, small invertebrates, and snails. They usually feed or forage on the ground but will also scavenge in the garbage around residential areas if given the opportunity.

The common grackle will often visit backyard bird feeders and don’t seem to be too picky when it comes to the type of feed present.

The Common Grackle has been seen at 47% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Large Hopper
  • Platform Feeder
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Suet
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanuts & Peanut Hearts
  • Fruit
  • Millet & Milo
  • Oats

23. Brown Thrasher

The Brown Thrasher is a common species of songbird found in North America and can be seen in Mississippi all year round. 

Males and Females are about 23-30cm (9.1-12 inches) long and weigh between 61-89g (2.1-3.1oz). They are slender birds with long legs, bills, and tails that often cock up much the same way as a Carolina Wren.

Brown thrashers have dark brown feathers above and a lighter white color with dark streaks below. They have long tails that are usually about the same length as their bodies, and their wings have two white wing bars, which also aids in distinguishing them from other species of birds. They have a gray-brown face with yellow eyes.

Brown Thrashers have a varied diet but prefer to eat insects such as grasshoppers or beetles found under rocks, leaves, or logs in the summer and fruits, nuts (acorns), and seeds in the winter.

Brown thrashers are most commonly found in forests near open fields where they can forage for insects on the ground; however, you can find a brown thrasher hanging around a bird feeder in the backyard, especially if suet and seeds are offered.

The Brown Thrasher has been seen at 47% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder type:

  • Platform
  • Ground

Feeder Food:

  • Black oil Sunflower Seeds
  • Hulled sunflower seeds
  • Suet
  • Cracker Corn
  • Peanut Hearts

24. Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is a small woodpecker found throughout North America and is a year-round resident of Mississippi. 

They are smaller than most woodpeckers at about 14-17cm (5.5-6.7 inches) long and weigh between 21-28g (0.7-1oz).

Downy Woodpeckers have a black back and white stripe down the middle. They are white below, and their wings have a checkered black and white detailing them. The males have a red patch at the back of the head, and females have a black head. They have a petite-looking bill compared to their other woodpecker relatives.

Their beaks are short, solid, and pointed at the end, which they use to chisel wood for excavation or peck at the bark to find food underneath.

Their preferred habitat is wooded areas with plenty of trees near rivers, ponds, or wetlands – even urban areas with a mix of grasslands, shrubs, and woodlands.

They are acrobatic foragers whose main diet consists of insects it can glean and probe from trees. They will also eat seeds, berries, or fruit when needed and are more common at bird feeders than their larger relatives. They prefer suet feeders and enjoy black oil sunflower seeds, peanut butter, seeds, and millet.

The Downy Woodpecker has been seen at 47% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Suet Cage
  • Large & Small Hopper
  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Black Oil & Hulled Sunflower Seeds
  • Safflower
  • Suet
  • Peanuts & Peanut Hearts
  • Mealworms

25. Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwings can be found across much of North America. These beautiful birds are primarily seen in Mississippi during the winter months.

They are about 14-17cm (5.5-6.7 inches) long and weigh around 32g (1.1oz). The Cedar Waxwing is a medium-sized bird with a sleek brown head and crest, black mask (like a bandit) soft brown above that fades to soft gray wings. They are a pale yellow below with bright yellow tips to their gray tail. They have distinctive red waxy tips to their secondary wings but are not always easy to see.

Cedar Waxwings are social birds that often travel in small flocks of 20-30 birds. They are very vocal birds and can often be heard while they forage for fruit. They can be found in woodlands, orchards, farms, gardens, or any area with fruiting trees.

They primarily feed on fruits and berries but supplement with insects in the summer months and will often visit backyard bird feeders that offer grapes or sliced oranges if available.

The Cedar Waxwing is an exciting bird to watch and observe. Its unique plumage makes it easy to identify, and its social nature makes it fun to see them traveling in flocks. Plus, who doesn’t love a good berry snack?

The Cedar Waxwing has been seen at 41% of all feeder sites in Mississippi.

Feeder Type:

  • Platform Feeder

Feeder Food:

  • Fruits

What Are The Most Common Backyard Birds All-Year-Round In Mississippi?

  • Northern Cardinal
  • House Finch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Carolina Chickadee
  • Carolina Wren
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • American Goldfinch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Blue Jay
  • Brown headed Cowbird
  • American Robin
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Eastern Bluebird
  • Northern Mockingbird
  • House Sparrow
  • Common Grackle
  • Brown Thrasher
  • Downy Woodpecker

What Are The Most Common Winter Backyard Birds Of Mississippi?

  • Pine Siskin
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Purple Finch
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler
  • Cedar Waxing

Birds To Spot Beyond The Backyard In Mississippi

When you decide to venture away from your home to do some birdwatching, these are some of the other birds to look out for:

  1. European Starling
  2. Rusty Blackbird
  3. Northern Rough winged Swallow
  4. Purple Martin
  5. Bank Swallow
  6. Eastern Kingbird
  7. Lapland Longspur
  8. Chimney Swift
  9. Tree Swallow
  10. Killdeer
  11. Barn Swallow
  12. American Crow
  13. Brewer’s Blackbird
  14. Bobolink
  15. Cliff Swallow
  16. White-winged Dove
  17. Boat-trailed Grackle
  18. Rock Pigeon
  19. Savannah Sparrow
  20. Dickcissel
  21. American Pipit
  22. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  23. Turkey Vulture
  24. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  25. Black Vulture

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How many species of birds are there in Mississippi?

There are 404 documented species of birds that have been observed in Mississippi.

What are the most common birds in mississippi?

The most common birds in Mississippi include the Northern Cardinal (100% frequency), House Finch (100% frequency), Tufted Titmouse (100% frequency), Carolina Chickadee (100% frequency), Caroline Wren (94% frequency), Red-bellied Woodpecker (94% frequency), American Goldfinch (88% frequency) and Mourning Dove (88% frequency).

how many species of birds are in mississippi?

There are 404 documented species of birds that have been observed in Mississippi.

Keeping A Watchful Eye for the backyard birds of Mississippi

We hope you enjoyed this post about the top backyard birds of Mississippi. As you can see, Mississippi is an excellent place for birdwatching because of the diverse climate and the variety of birds that live in the state. You can attract many of these birds to your yard by providing the right food and habitat.

If you’re looking to venture out and do some birding, then visit one of Mississippi’s best hotspots for birdwatching.

We would also love to hear from you about your favorite birdwatching spots or experiences in Mississippi.

If you have any questions about identifying more species or finding out which ones live near you, let us know! We would love to help identify new bird species for our readers.

Don’t forget to check out our other blog posts for more information about birds and nature. Also, don’t forget to share this post with your friends and family!

Photo of author
Author
When I was going through a really tough time in my life, I began watching birds as a way to find peace during the most stressful parts of my day. Now I am an enthusiastic birdwatcher and love feeding the wild birds in my backyard. It's so peaceful to be surrounded by nature and watch these beautiful creatures flit around.

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